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Custom Test Report Comparative Performance Evaluation
Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450 vs.
Epson Stylus Pro 7900

Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450
Epson Stylus Pro 7900
Colour Print Quality
Black Print Quality
Device Feature Set
Print Driver Feature Set
Colour Stability using calibration link
Printhead Reliability / Cleaning Routines
Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450
Epson Stylus Pro 7900
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Canon iPF6450 v Epson SP7900 Custom Test Report Buyers Laboratory LLC (BLI) was commissioned by Canon Europe to conduct confidential document imaging de-vice performance testing on the Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450 with Spectrophotometer and the Epson Stylus Pro 7900 with Spectroproofer, and produce a report comparing the relative strengths and weaknesses of the two products in terms of image quality, productivity, ink consumption, device feature set, driver functionality, spec-trophotometer functionality, colour stability, printhead stability and cleaning routines. All testing was performed in BLI's test facility in Wokingham, UK. TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary Colour Image Quality Black Image Quality Print Productivity Device Feature Set Driver Feature Set Spectrophotometer Functionality Colour Stability using calibration link Printhead Reliability / Cleaning Routines Supporting Test Data Ink Consumption Test Methodology Overview Executive Summary The Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450 gave an outstanding performance in BLI's testing, delivering higher produc-tivity, superior image quality, lower ink consumption and a stronger device and driver feature set when compared with the Epson Stylus Pro 7900. The Epson model delivers smaller (but variable) ink-drop sizes, has a larger ink cartridge capacity and lower power consumption while printing (but not in standby mode).
As would be expected of two models aimed at the Graphic Arts (GA) marketplace, both units delivered excellent image quality overall, with the Canon iPF6450 showing a noticeable improvement over the previous generation iPF6350 model. The Canon iPF6450 delivered an 8.1% higher colour gamut on Photo paper, crisper text, less stair-stepping in diagonal lines and less colour drift than the Epson unit to give it the edge overall.
This report has been reproduced with the written permission of Buyers Laboratory LLC. Any duplication of this report without the written permission of Buyers Laboratory is unlawful and violators will be prosecuted. 2013 Buyers Laboratory LLC. To purchase reprints, contact BLI at (201) 488-0404 (x17) or at info@buyerslab.com. • 121205


Canon iPF6450 v Epson SP7900 Custom Test Report An outstanding feature offered by both models is the option of attaching an X-Rite Spectrophotometer (which Epson calls a SpectroProofer) to guarantee colour consistency and to automate workflows for colour calibration, target measurement and media profile generation when used in conjunction with software tools offered by both companies. Epson offers Look Up Table (LUT) technology for spot colour optimization, increased gamut size and verification of colour difference from the test targets. Canon's innovative Media Configuration Tool, in conjunction with the Colour Calibration Management Console utility offers an important advantage over the Epson software in that it can also be used to check colour consistency across a whole range of compatible large-format devices, even those in remote locations—a significant advantage for proofing in the Graphic Arts, Photography and Ad-vertising industries where colour consistency across devices is a paramount concern. In BLI's testing, the Canon model's SU-21 Spectrophotometer achieved an astonishingly low Delta E variation of 0.6 when the FOGRA39 colour patch was printed on the iPF6450 and the iPF 8400. Canon's free Colour Calibration Management Console utility also enables administrators to monitor the calibration status of each connected unit remotely. The utility dis-plays a progress bar for each media type to indicate when a colour calibration should be conducted, and features a Delta E threshold setting whose default value is 2.0 on a scale of 0.4 to 5.0, ensuring that a low colour difference is maintained over time. The test included an ink consumption evaluation, in which BLI assessed the cost of printing with three different document types in Standard/Quality mode on semi-gloss 250-gsm proofing media, on plain paper and on 250-gsm semi-gloss photo media. In all of BLI's ink consumption print runs, the Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450 used significantly less ink in terms of net weight and a far lower percentage of available ink in the cartridge than the Epson Stylus Pro 7900.
The Canon model also offers a number of print driver feature advantages over the Epson model, including more media profiles and colour adjustment options. Canon's Color imageRUNNER Enlargement Copy Mode allows us-ers to integrate with a smaller-format MFP to produce enlarged poster-size copies, although this functionality is matched by Epson's CopyFactory Utility. Colour Image Quality Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450
Epson Stylus Pro 7900
Fine Lines
Colour Drift across FOGRA39
Consistency of three skin tones
Consistency of neutral grey
Colour Gamut
This report has been reproduced with the written permission of Buyers Laboratory LLC. Any duplication of this report without the written permission of Buyers Laboratory is unlawful and violators will be prosecuted. 2013 Buyers Laboratory LLC. To purchase reprints, contact BLI at (201) 488-0404 (x17) or at info@buyerslab.com. • 121205


Canon iPF6450 v Epson SP7900 Custom Test Report All image quality testing was done with Canon's own Proofing Semi-glossy 195-gsm media and Epson's own 240-gsm proofing media, with print priority set to Proof and quality set to High on the Canon model, and the Epson model set to Quality (720 dpi).
As would be expected of two models aimed at the Graphic Arts (GA) marketplace, both units delivered a very high standard of output in colour, with only slight differences in some respects, with the Canon iPF6450 showing a noticeable improvement over the previous generation iPF6350 model.
 The Canon iPF6450 and the Epson 7900 displayed clear formation of fonts in colour mode down to 3-point size. There was very little visual difference in clarity of text when viewed with and without magnification, but Canon's fonts were crisper than those from the Epson device.
 The Canon iPF6450 produced the 1x1 pixel grid in CMY without error, whereas the Epson 7900 failed to deliver consistent coverage across the grid.  Both devices delivered excellent vertical and horizontal fine lines down to 0.1 size but the Epson device showed a significant amount of stair-stepping in diagonal lines compared with only a slight amount of stair-stepping with the Canon model.
Both models delivered an impressive range of halftone fills in colour mode, with distinct transitions between all levels.
The two models produced optical densities that were virtually identical for cyan and black, while the Canon unit had a slightly higher density for magenta and the Epson device had a slightly higher density for yellow.
Both Canon and Epson models exhibited natural looking skin tones in photographic images.
— When evaluating the consistency with which different skin tones were delivered, the Canon model displayed slightly greater variance with two of the three skin shades when compared with the Epson model. Neutral grey consistency was the same for both models, with equally low variance across the page with ultra-low Delta E values that would not be discernible to the naked eye.  During BLI's colour drift analysis, the Canon model displayed a mean Delta E drift of just 1.6, compared with the Epson device's mean drift of 6.5. In the colour drift analysis, the FOGRA39 media wedge is submitted to print before and after productivity and ink consumption tests, and measured using EFI Colour Verifier software. When FOGRA39 patches taken before the ink consumption test were compared with the FOGRA39 master, the Canon delivered a lower mean Delta E of 5.5 than the Epson unit's mean Delta E, which was 9.9.
 The Canon device's colour gamut was marginally (0.16%) larger than that achieved by the Epson model when printed on proofing/semi-gloss media in highest quality settings, but 8.1% higher on photo quality paper.
BLI analysed a wide range of colour and greyscale regions in business graphics and photographic images output by both devices and found them to be comparable overall, with excellent fine details in light and dark contrast areas. This report has been reproduced with the written permission of Buyers Laboratory LLC. Any duplication of this report without the written permission of Buyers Laboratory is unlawful and violators will be prosecuted. 2013 Buyers Laboratory LLC. To purchase reprints, contact BLI at (201) 488-0404 (x17) or at info@buyerslab.com. • 121205


Canon iPF6450 v Epson SP7900 Custom Test Report Black Image Quality Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450
Epson Stylus Pro 7900
Fine Lines
 In black mode, the Canon iPF6450 and the Epson Stylus Pro 7900 again displayed clear formation of fonts down to the 3-point size, but the Canon model's fonts were noticeably crisper than those from the Epson device.
 The Canon iPF6450 produced the 1x1 pixel grid in black without error, whereas the Epson 7900 could not deliver consistent coverage across the grid.  Both devices delivered excellent vertical and horizontal fine lines in black down to the 0.1 size but the Epson device showed a significant amount of stair-stepping in diagonal lines compared with only a slight amount of stair-stepping with the Canon model.
Both models delivered an excellent range of halftone fills, with distinct transitions between all levels.
The devices shared honours in terms of solid optical density in black, but the Epson model showed less variance across the test target. BLI analysed a wide range of monochrome and greyscale output in business graphics and photographic images from both models and found them to be comparable overall, with excellent fine details in both light and dark contrast areas. Print Productivity Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450
Epson Stylus Pro 7900
First Page Out From Ready State (Fast/Speed)
First Page Out From Ready State (Standard/Quality)
First Page Out From Ready State (High/Max Quality)
Throughput Speed Portrait (Fast/Speed)
Throughput Speed Portrait (Standard/Quality)
Throughput Speed Retail Poster(Fast/Speed)
Throughput Speed Retail Poster (Standard/Quality)
This report has been reproduced with the written permission of Buyers Laboratory LLC. Any duplication of this report without the written permission of Buyers Laboratory is unlawful and violators will be prosecuted. 2013 Buyers Laboratory LLC. To purchase reprints, contact BLI at (201) 488-0404 (x17) or at info@buyerslab.com. • 121205


Canon iPF6450 v Epson SP7900 Custom Test Report  When printing a high-resolution portrait, the Canon model delivered faster first-page-out times than the Epson model from the ready state in all modes, though times were quite close in High/Max Quality mode (299 seconds for the Canon iPF6450 versus 303 seconds for the Epson 7900).  When printing a medium-resolution Retail Poster, the Canon model again delivered faster first-page-out times than the Epson model from the ready state in all modes, though times were quite close in High/Max Quality mode (275 seconds for the Canon iPF6450 versus 289 seconds for the Epson 7900).  When printing five pages of a single-page A1-size high-resolution portrait test document in both Fast/Speed and Standard/Quality modes, the Canon model displayed a clear speed advantage over the Epson model, with times that were 34.3% faster in Fast/Speed mode and 51.6% faster in Standard/Quality mode.
 When printing five pages of a single-page A1-size medium-resolution retail poster test document in both Fast/ Speed and Standard/Quality modes, the Canon model again displayed a clear speed advantage over the Epson model, with times that were 18.7% faster in Fast/Speed mode and 36.0% faster in Standard/Quality mode.
BLI analysts observed that, owing to the vagaries of inkjet technology (for example, head flushing and calibration routines can occur at any time during testing), the same test can produce different results at different times. Although BLI makes every effort to ensure that devices are tested on a level playing field, the test results should be regarded as an indicator of likely performance and not as a prediction of actual ink consumption in a real-world environment.
Results averaged across three tests of 50-set A1 printing in Standard /Quality Mode Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450
Epson Stylus Pro 7900
PACKAGING PROOF (Standard / Quality Mode)
Overall weight of ink used (grams)

Percentage of total ink used averaged across all colours
RETAIL POSTER
Overall weight of ink used (grams)

Percentage of total ink used averaged across all colours
STUDIO PORTRAIT
Overall weight of ink used (grams)

Percentage of total ink used averaged across all colours
 In all of the BLI Packaging Proof ink consumption print runs using Standard/ Quality mode on 255-gsm Semi- gloss Proofing media, the Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450 used significantly less ink in terms of net weight than the Epson Stylus Pro 7900.  In all of the BLI Packaging Proof print runs using Standard/Quality mode on 255-gsm Semi-gloss Proofing me- dia, the Canon model used a much lower percentage of available ink than the Epson model. This report has been reproduced with the written permission of Buyers Laboratory LLC. Any duplication of this report without the written permission of Buyers Laboratory is unlawful and violators will be prosecuted. 2013 Buyers Laboratory LLC. To purchase reprints, contact BLI at (201) 488-0404 (x17) or at info@buyerslab.com. • 121205


Canon iPF6450 v Epson SP7900 Custom Test Report  In all of the BLI Retail Poster print runs using Standard/ Quality mode on plain coated media, the Canon image- PROGRAF iPF6450 used significantly less ink in terms of net weight than the Epson Stylus Pro 7900.  In all of the BLI Retail Poster print runs using Standard/Quality mode on plain coated media, the Canon unit used a much lower percentage of ink available in the cartridges than the Epson device.  In all of the BLI Studio Portrait ink consumption print runs using Standard/ Quality mode on 250-gsm Semi-gloss Photo media, the Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450 used significantly less ink in terms of net weight than the Epson Stylus Pro 7900.  In all of the BLI Studio Portrait print runs using Standard/Quality mode on 250 gsm Semi-gloss Photo media, the Canon iPF6450 used a much lower percentage of available ink than the Epson 7900. Device Feature Set  The Epson Stylus Pro 7900 employs eleven inks, four of which are different shades of black, whilst the Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450 employs twelve inks including two black and two grey inks. The fact that the Canon inks are replaceable during operation helps to reduce downtime.
 The Canon model's two printheads contain more nozzles per colour than the Epson unit's single printhead.
— The Canon unit's ink delivery system dispenses a slightly larger drop size than the Epson ink delivery system. — The Epson ink cartridge capacity is significantly larger than that of the Canon model.
Both models offer borderless printing.
 The Canon model has a larger standard memory capacity (384 MB) than the Epson unit which has a 256-MB  The Canon model has a 250-GB hard drive, which allows for the storage of commonly used documents and aids spooling workflow; the Epson device doesn't have a hard drive, even as an option.
— The Canon model has a higher advertised peak energy value (100W) than the Epson model (70W).
 However, the Canon iPF6450's energy consumption in standby mode (where it will spend a large amount of time) is just 6 W compared with 16 W for the Epson device.
 The Canon model includes a plug-in for Microsoft Office, which provides a wizard that walks users through the process of creating posters from Word, Excel or PowerPoint, avoiding the need for complex resizing. This fea-ture is not offered on the Epson model.  The Canon model includes PosterArtist Lite, Canon's software for creating posters and signage in simple steps. The full version of Canon PosterArtist, available as an option, offers more advanced features such as auto de-sign, variable data printing, in-application editing features, plus additional templates, photos and clip art. Epson does not supply an equivalent product.
 The Canon device includes a media mismatch option, which places on hold jobs that can't be printed due to incorrect media being loaded, while jobs that can be completed are printed; the held jobs are printed once the required paper is loaded. The Epson device does not offer this capability, and continues printing on the mis-matched media, which results in ink and media waste. This report has been reproduced with the written permission of Buyers Laboratory LLC. Any duplication of this report without the written permission of Buyers Laboratory is unlawful and violators will be prosecuted. 2013 Buyers Laboratory LLC. To purchase reprints, contact BLI at (201) 488-0404 (x17) or at info@buyerslab.com. • 121205 Canon iPF6450 v Epson SP7900 Custom Test Report  Canon offers a wide variety of software options designed to appeal to specific segments of the graphic arts market such as photography and fine art display, including a print plug-in for Photoshop which prints 16-bit files directly from Adobe RGB with a wide gamut and clear tonal gradation, and a plug-in for DPP (Digital Photo Professional) that includes a ‘Digital Lens Optimizer' to improve photographic image quality and enhance depth of field.  Canon's Accounting Manager, accessed via the Status Monitor, offers comprehensive accounting management for all print jobs. Users enter the actual costs for individual inks and media types, and the cost per job is calcu-lated automatically and displayed. For each job, the media type, area, ink used and total print time are listed, and more detailed cost and consumption can be obtained by double-clicking on an individual job name or by highlighting a range of different jobs. Job cost information can then be saved in .CSV format and opened in Ex-cel.
Epson's LFP Accounting Tool, a free download from Epson's website for other large-format Epson devices, does not seem to be available for the SP7900.
Driver Feature Set  The Canon driver includes 55 media profiles versus 30 for the Epson driver.
 The Canon driver includes a watermark capability; the Epson driver does not.  The Canon driver also includes a Thicken Fine Lines image enhancement option; the Epson driver offers only Both the Canon and Epson drivers offer N-up (up to 16 and 4, respectively) and poster printing (2 x 2 and 4 x 4, respectively) capabilities.
— The page-stamping capabilities of both the Canon and Epson driver include date and time and user name. The Canon driver adds page number, while the Epson driver adds the time, printer name, comment, document name and print settings.
The Canon driver includes a utility, Colour imageRUNNER Enlargement Copy Mode, which allows users to in-tegrate a Canon MFP device or other scanner with the imagePROGRAF iPF6450. Documents scanned by the Canon MFP are automatically routed to a hot folder, which is monitored by the imagePROGRAF iPF6450 driver. Users can also set up other scanners to route files directly to the hot folder. The image is then resized and print-ed, offering a fast, easy-to-use poster creation tool for office users. A similar feature is offered to Epson users in the form of its Epson CopyFactory Utility, but this has not been tested by BLI. The Canon model's device status monitor can be accessed directly from the front tab of the driver, whereas us-ers of the Epson model must access device status via an icon on the utility tab, which requires one more click.  The Canon driver includes a wider selection of simple colour adjustment options, including brightness, contrast, saturation and CMYK sliding scale adjustments. The Epson driver is limited to only CMY with brightness, con-trast and saturation control.  The Canon driver includes more advanced colour-matching capabilities, including the ability to match ICC pro- files and select the rendering intent based on different elements in the document. The Epson driver offers more limited colour-matching options, with no rendering-intent options.  The Canon driver includes a unidirectional print selection, whereas the Epson driver does not. This report has been reproduced with the written permission of Buyers Laboratory LLC. Any duplication of this report without the written permission of Buyers Laboratory is unlawful and violators will be prosecuted. 2013 Buyers Laboratory LLC. To purchase reprints, contact BLI at (201) 488-0404 (x17) or at info@buyerslab.com. • 121205 Canon iPF6450 v Epson SP7900 Custom Test Report Canon Print Driver Main Tab
Canon Print Driver Page Setup Tab
Canon Print Driver Layout Tab
Canon Print Driver Favourites Tab
Canon Status Monitor Utility
Canon Colour Adjustment Settings
This report has been reproduced with the written permission of Buyers Laboratory LLC. Any duplication of this report without the written permission of Buyers Laboratory is unlawful and violators will be prosecuted. 2013 Buyers Laboratory LLC. To purchase reprints, contact BLI at (201) 488-0404 (x17) or at info@buyerslab.com. • 121205 Canon iPF6450 v Epson SP7900 Custom Test Report Epson Print Driver Main Tab
Epson Print Driver Page Layout Tab
Epson Print Driver Utility Tab
Epson Print Driver Current Settings
Epson Status Monitor
Epson Print Driver Colour Adjustments Tab
This report has been reproduced with the written permission of Buyers Laboratory LLC. Any duplication of this report without the written permission of Buyers Laboratory is unlawful and violators will be prosecuted. 2013 Buyers Laboratory LLC. To purchase reprints, contact BLI at (201) 488-0404 (x17) or at info@buyerslab.com. • 121205 Canon iPF6450 v Epson SP7900 Custom Test Report An outstanding feature offered with both models is the option of attaching an X-Rite Spectrophotometer (which Epson calls a SpectroProofer) to ensure colour consistency and automate workflows for colour calibration, target measurement and media profile generation when used in conjunction with software tools offered by both companies. Epson offers Look Up Table (LUT) technology for spot colour optimization, increased gamut size and verifi-cation of colour difference from the test targets. + The Canon iPF 6450 enables users to switch a UV filter on or off (via software) to ensure colour consistency where certain Proofing or Photo media have been artificially whitened. The Epson SP 7900 obliges users to choose at the point of purchase between the Spectroproofer either with or without a UV filter.
+ The Canon model supports XRGA, X-Rite's Standard for Graphic Arts which ensures consistency in colour measurement and calibration between instruments from all the major vendors including X-Rite. The Epson SP7900 offers no support for the XRGA standard.
Colour Stability using calibration link  The Canon iPF6450 has a built-in multi-sensor or densitometer positioned on the printhead to conduct a colour calibration which can be applied to all Canon media as well as third-party media used on the device. Canon recommends that calibration is performed after the printer is installed, after printheads are replaced, or if colour appears to vary over time. For third-party media, a calibration can be initiated either at the con-trol panel or via the Colour Calibration Management Console utility. After initiation a colour calibration chart is automatically printed and scanned using a three-colour LED, and the colour calibration results are set automatically.
 Canon's calibration process is a one-off procedure which covers all resolutions, whereas the Epson model requires users to perform a separate calibration for each available resolution setting. The Canon model's calibration routine takes about 10 minutes to perform and uses just 25 cm of paper and an average of 10 grams of ink, whereas the Epson unit takes about 15 minutes for each calibration routine, and if all four resolution settings are required it can take up to an hour, using 90 cm of paper and an average of 4 grams of ink.
 Canon's innovative Media Configuration Tool and Colour Calibration Management Console utility offer an important advantage over the Epson software in that they can also be used to check for and maintain colour consistency across a whole range of compatible large-format devices, even ones in remote locations—a significant advantage for proofing in the Graphic Arts, Photography and Advertising industries where con-sistency of colour across devices is a paramount concern.  In BLI's testing, the Canon iPF6450 with the SU-21 Spectrophotometer produced output with an aston- ishingly low Delta E variation of 0.6 from the same FOGRA39 colour patch printed by the iPF 8400. (This correlates closely with the equally impressive Delta E variation of 1.39 obtained with the same two devices with an IT8 colour patch during BLI's Lab Testing in the USA). Canon's free Colour Calibration Management Console utility also enables administrators to monitor the calibration status of each connected unit remotely when required. The utility displays a progress bar for each media type to indicate when a colour calibration should be conducted, and features a Delta E threshold setting whose default value is 2.0 on a scale of 0.4 to 5.0, ensuring that colour consistency is maintained over time. This report has been reproduced with the written permission of Buyers Laboratory LLC. Any duplication of this report without the written permission of Buyers Laboratory is unlawful and violators will be prosecuted. 2013 Buyers Laboratory LLC. To purchase reprints, contact BLI at (201) 488-0404 (x17) or at info@buyerslab.com. • 121205 Canon iPF6450 v Epson SP7900 Custom Test Report Printhead Reliability / Cleaning Routines Both models offer three choices of settings for nozzle checks at the control panel. The Canon iPF6450 has settings for Off, Per Print or Auto (the default setting), while the Epson 7900 has settings for Periodic (the default mode), On (Per Job) or Off.
 When a clogged nozzle is detected on the Canon unit, it automatically runs a cleaning cycle in the back- ground to maintain image quality and consistency, with no user intervention required. If a clogged nozzle is detected on the Epson device, the control panel alerts users that a cleaning cycle is required, and offers a choice between waiting until a print run is finished, or cancelling a print job and running a cleaning cycle immediately. The Epson unit's method requires more user intervention.
 When the two devices were powered off completely over a weekend, the Canon model had no issues with nozzles clogging. If a nozzle check pattern was requested, it printed with perfect accuracy every time. In contrast, on every occasion that the Epson model was powered off over a weekend, the nozzles became clogged and a cleaning cycle was required. This would result in a good deal of downtime for Epson users, and waste a considerable amount of ink and paper.
 As the Epson 7900 has both matte black and photo black inks which share the same printhead, users are required to choose to switch between them for a specific job at the control panel—a process which takes about three minutes and uses an additional 2.5 grams of ink.
The Canon model uses 0.5 grams of ink per cartridge on average during cleaning cycles, which take just under six minutes on average to complete.
 The Epson model uses between 1.3 and 1.7 grams of ink per cartridge during cleaning cycles, taking be- tween five and nine minutes.
This report has been reproduced with the written permission of Buyers Laboratory LLC. Any duplication of this report without the written permission of Buyers Laboratory is unlawful and violators will be prosecuted. 2013 Buyers Laboratory LLC. To purchase reprints, contact BLI at (201) 488-0404 (x17) or at info@buyerslab.com. • 121205 Canon iPF6450 v Epson SP7900 Custom Test Report Supporting teSt Data Colour Throughput Time – High Resolution Portrait Printing Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450
Epson Stylus Pro 7900
(time in seconds)
(time in seconds)
A single page high-resolution A1 portrait was printed as a 5-set job using the device driver set to the plain paper /colour setting. Both devices were loaded with 24" rolls, with each file set to auto-rotate to save media. The time indicated is the time from the cutting of the first page to the cutting of the final page to assess throughput speed of the final four. Colour Throughput Time – Medium Resolution Retail Poster Printing Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450
Epson Stylus Pro 7900
(time in seconds)
(time in seconds)
A single-page medium resolution A1 retail poster was printed as a 5-page job using the device driver set to the plain paper /colour setting. Both devices were loaded with 24" rolls with each file set to auto-rotate to save media. The time indicated is the time from the cutting of the first page to the cutting of the final page to assess the throughput speed of the final four pages. First-Page-Out Time from Ready State – High-Resolution Portrait Printing Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450
Epson Stylus Pro 7900
(time in seconds)
(time in seconds)
Time Before Printing Commences
First Print Out
First-page-out times are achieved by sending an A1 high resolution portrait PDF file to print, timed from release to page out with the Canon driver set to the plain paper setting and the Epson driver set to plain paper, black mode. Both devices were loaded with 24" rolls, with each file set to auto-rotate to save media. First-Page-Out Time from Ready State – Medium-Resolution Retail Poster Printing Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450
Epson Stylus Pro 7900
(time in seconds)
(time in seconds)
Time Before Printing Commences
First Print Out
First-page-out times are achieved by sending an A1 medium resolution retail poster PDF file to print, timed from release to page out with the Canon driver set to the plain paper setting and the Epson driver set to plain paper, black mode. Both devices were loaded with 24" rolls, with each file set to auto-rotate to save media. This report has been reproduced with the written permission of Buyers Laboratory LLC. Any duplication of this report without the written permission of Buyers Laboratory is unlawful and violators will be prosecuted. 2013 Buyers Laboratory LLC. To purchase reprints, contact BLI at (201) 488-0404 (x17) or at info@buyerslab.com. • 121205 Canon iPF6450 v Epson SP7900 Custom Test Report Colour Print Quality Colour Optical Density Evaluation
Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450: Proofing Paper Semi-Glossy High (600 dpi)
Epson Stylus Pro 7900: Standard Proofing Paper Quality (720 x 1440 dpi )
Note: Colour density readings were assessed by printing a BLI test file on proofing paper in high-quality colour settings and measuring the density of 100% dot fill using an XRite 508 densitometer.
This report has been reproduced with the written permission of Buyers Laboratory LLC. Any duplication of this report without the written permission of Buyers Laboratory is unlawful and violators will be prosecuted. 2013 Buyers Laboratory LLC. To purchase reprints, contact BLI at (201) 488-0404 (x17) or at info@buyerslab.com. • 121205 Canon iPF6450 v Epson SP7900 Custom Test Report Skin Tone and Neutral Grey Consistency
Skin Tone 1 (C=6, M=15,Y=16,K=0) Skin Tone 2 (C=30, M=63,Y=75,K=0) Canon imagePROGRAF
Epson Stylus Pro
Canon imagePROGRAF
Epson Stylus Pro
Colour block
Colour block
Max. Delta E
Max. Delta E
Skin Tone 3 (C=19, M=33,Y=50,K=0) Canon imagePROGRAF
Epson Stylus
Canon imagePROGRAF Epson Stylus Pro
Colour block
Colour block
Max. Delta E
Max. Delta E
Note: Skin tone and neutral grey consistency measurements are based on nine readings taken from a BLI proprietary PDF test target file comprising four A1-sized solid coverage documents of three skin tones and a neutral grey with the High/Quality print quality setting selected in the driver and the target printed on the manufacturer's own brand of proofing semi-gloss media. Colour differences across the A1 image were measured comparing eight locations to that of the colour measured at the top left of the page, using an EFI ES1000 colour spectrophotometer and Gretag MacBeth EyeOne Share colour comparison software. This report has been reproduced with the written permission of Buyers Laboratory LLC. Any duplication of this report without the written permission of Buyers Laboratory is unlawful and violators will be prosecuted. 2013 Buyers Laboratory LLC. To purchase reprints, contact BLI at (201) 488-0404 (x17) or at info@buyerslab.com. • 121205 Canon iPF6450 v Epson SP7900 Custom Test Report FOGRA 39 DRIFT TEST: comparison of FOGRA39 colour patches before and after ink consumption test.
Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450
Epson Stylus Pro 7900
Delta E Drift
FOGRA 39 FIDELITY TEST: FOGRA39 colour patches taken before ink consumption test starts compared to FOGRA39 master.
Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450
Epson Stylus Pro 7900
Delta E Fidelity
Colour Gamut Comparison Epson Stylus Pro 7900 colour gamut on proofing paper in
highest quality settings (red) versus Canon imagePROGRAF
iPF6450 colour gamut (shown chromatical y) on proofing
paper in highest quality settings.
Canon iPF6450 Colour Gamut on Proofing Paper
Epson Stylus Pro 7900 Gamut on Proofing Paper
This report has been reproduced with the written permission of Buyers Laboratory LLC. Any duplication of this report without the written permission of Buyers Laboratory is unlawful and violators will be prosecuted. 2013 Buyers Laboratory LLC. To purchase reprints, contact BLI at (201) 488-0404 (x17) or at info@buyerslab.com. • 121205 Canon iPF6450 v Epson SP7900 Custom Test Report Epson Stylus Pro 7900 colour gamut on photo paper in highest quality
settings (red) versus Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450 colour gamut
(shown chromatical y) on photo paper in highest quality settings.
Canon iPF6450 Colour Gamut on Photo Paper
Epson Stylus Pro 7900 Gamut on Photo Paper
This report has been reproduced with the written permission of Buyers Laboratory LLC. Any duplication of this report without the written permission of Buyers Laboratory is unlawful and violators will be prosecuted. 2013 Buyers Laboratory LLC. To purchase reprints, contact BLI at (201) 488-0404 (x17) or at info@buyerslab.com. • 121205 Canon iPF6450 v Epson SP7900 Custom Test Report Device Feature Set Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450
Epson Stylus Pro 7900
Max. print quality
2,400 x 1,200 dpi 2,880 x 1,440 dpi Number of inks
Ink tanks replaceable during
Ink-drop size
Minimum 3.5 picoliter (variable) Ink cartridge capacity
90 ml (Starter), Number of nozzles
30,720 (2,560 per colour) 3,600 (360 per colour) Number of printheads
Minimum line width
Minimum print margins
Borderless (0 mm) printing
Maximum outside diameter of roll
Maximum printable paper roll
18 m (varies according to the OS and Limited by application, OS and driver/RIP Maximum cut-sheet media length
Maximum media thickness
1.5 mm from front Maximum media width
Optional media handling
Roll media adapter Standard RAM
Maximum RAM
Hard drive
10/100/1000Base-T/TX Ethernet, USB 100Base-TX/10Base-T Ethernet, USB 2.0 GARO (Graphic Arts with Raster Net weight (unpacked)
Power consumption when in
Power consumption when active
Operation: 47 dB (A) or less; Standby: 35 dB (A) or less Operation: Less than 50 dB (A); Operation: 6.4 Bels or less Information not available This report has been reproduced with the written permission of Buyers Laboratory LLC. Any duplication of this report without the written permission of Buyers Laboratory is unlawful and violators will be prosecuted. 2013 Buyers Laboratory LLC. To purchase reprints, contact BLI at (201) 488-0404 (x17) or at info@buyerslab.com. • 121205 Canon iPF6450 v Epson SP7900 Custom Test Report Driver Feature Set Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450
Epson Stylus Pro 7900
5 (Fast 300, Standard 300, Stan- dard 600, High 600, Highest 600) Up to 5 depending on media settings depending on media settings Economy mode
7 (Under Easy Settings) Overview of profile settings
IQ optimized for options
Sharpen text
Thicken fine lines
Mirror image
Poster print mode
Yes (Date, Time, Document/User/Printer Name, Media Type, Print Quality Level, Resolution, Yes (Date, Time, Name, Page Print Mode, High Speed, Finest Detail, Edge Smoothing, Colour Adjustment and Value, Yes, auto 180 degrees Yes, auto 180 degrees Option to preview before print
Link to device Web server from
No (there is a link to Status No (there is also a link to Status Monitor 3) CMYK balance adjustment
Advanced colour management
Enlargement Copy Mode
Yes (CopyFactory Utility) Free Layout Capability
MS Office Plug-in
Disable automatic cutter
Unidirectional printing selection
Integration with MFP
This report has been reproduced with the written permission of Buyers Laboratory LLC. Any duplication of this report without the written permission of Buyers Laboratory is unlawful and violators will be prosecuted. 2013 Buyers Laboratory LLC. To purchase reprints, contact BLI at (201) 488-0404 (x17) or at info@buyerslab.com. • 121205 Canon iPF6450 v Epson SP7900 Custom Test Report Table 1: Amount of Ink in Each Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450 Cartridge (in grams) Weight of car-
tridge prior to
installation
Weight of car-

tridge at end
of life
Net weight

Total Ink Weight across 12 cartridges
Table 2: Amount of Ink in Each Epson Stylus Pro 7900 Cartridge (in grams) Weight of cartridge
prior to installation
Weight of cartridge at
end of life
Net weight of ink
Total Ink Weight across 11 cartridges
This report has been reproduced with the written permission of Buyers Laboratory LLC. Any duplication of this report without the written permission of Buyers Laboratory is unlawful and violators will be prosecuted. 2013 Buyers Laboratory LLC. To purchase reprints, contact BLI at (201) 488-0404 (x17) or at info@buyerslab.com. • 121205 Canon iPF6450 v Epson SP7900 Custom Test Report Table 3: Ink Used in Three 50-Page Runs of Packaging Proof Test Document (Draft Mode) on the Canon iPF6450 (grams) Test Run 1
Net weight of
ink used
Test Run 2

Net weight of
ink used
Test Run 3

Net weight of
ink used
Average

amount of
across three
runs
Total average ink weight across 12 cartridges

Table 4: Ink Used in Three 50-Page Runs of Packaging Proof Test Document (Draft Mode) on the Epson Stylus Pro 7900 (grams) Test Run 1
Net weight of ink
used
Test Run 2

Net weight of ink
used
Test Run 3

Net weight of ink
used
Average amount

of ink used across
three runs
Total average ink weight across 11 cartridges

This report has been reproduced with the written permission of Buyers Laboratory LLC. Any duplication of this report without the written permission of Buyers Laboratory is unlawful and violators will be prosecuted. 2013 Buyers Laboratory LLC. To purchase reprints, contact BLI at (201) 488-0404 (x17) or at info@buyerslab.com. • 121205 Canon iPF6450 v Epson SP7900 Custom Test Report Table 5: Ink Used in Three 50-Page Runs of Retail Poster Test Document on the Canon iPF6450 (grams) Test Run 1
Net weight of
ink used
Test Run 2

Net weight of
ink used
Test Run 3

Net weight of
ink used
Average

amount of
across three
runs
Total average ink weight across 12 cartridges

Table 6: Ink Used in Three 50-Page Runs of Retail Poster Test Document on the Epson Stylus Pro 7900 (grams) Test Run 1
Net weight of ink
used
Test Run 2

Net weight of ink
used
Test Run 3

Net weight of ink
used
Average amount

of ink used across
three runs
Total average ink weight across 11 cartridges

This report has been reproduced with the written permission of Buyers Laboratory LLC. Any duplication of this report without the written permission of Buyers Laboratory is unlawful and violators will be prosecuted. 2013 Buyers Laboratory LLC. To purchase reprints, contact BLI at (201) 488-0404 (x17) or at info@buyerslab.com. • 121205 Canon iPF6450 v Epson SP7900 Custom Test Report Table 7: Ink Used in Three 50-Page Runs of Studio Portrait Test Document on the Canon iPF6450 (grams) Test Run 1
Net weight of
ink used
Test Run 2

Net weight of
ink used
Test Run 3

Net weight of
ink used
Average

amount of
across three
runs
Total average ink weight across 12 cartridges

Table 8: Ink Used in three 50-page Runs of Studio Portrait Test Document on the Epson Stylus Pro 7900 (grams) Test Run 1
Net weight of ink
used
Test Run 2

Net weight of ink
used
Test Run 3

Net weight of ink
used
Average amount

of ink used across
three runs
Total average ink weight across 11 cartridges

Ink Consumption Test Methodology Overview Buyers Lab's ink consumption analysis was conducted using three document types (proof, retail poster and pho-to). The Packaging Proof document was formatted as a PDF, the Retail Poster as a JPG file and the Studio Portrait was formatted as a TIFF file and all three were sized at ISO A1. This report has been reproduced with the written permission of Buyers Laboratory LLC. Any duplication of this report without the written permission of Buyers Laboratory is unlawful and violators will be prosecuted. 2013 Buyers Laboratory LLC. To purchase reprints, contact BLI at (201) 488-0404 (x17) or at info@buyerslab.com. • 121205 Canon iPF6450 v Epson SP7900 Custom Test Report The Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450 was installed in BLI's lab with the latest level of firmware (as of March 2013) and connected to a Windows 7 workstation using a 1000BaseT TCP/IP connection. The device was left in default configuration throughout testing. The Canon GARO driver was used for all testing and was left in default colour setting unless otherwise specified. The Packaging Proof document was printed on 255 gsm Semi-gloss proofing media in Standard mode, The Retail Poster was printed on plain coated media in Standard mode, and the Studio Portrait phot was printed on 250 gsm Semi-gloss Photo media in Standard Mode The Epson Stylus Pro 7900 was installed in BLI's lab with the latest level of firmware (as of March 2013) and con-nected to a Windows 7 workstation using a 100BaseT TCP/IP connection. The device was left in default configu-ration throughout testing. The Epson ESC/P driver was used for all testing and was left in default colour setting unless otherwise specified, with media selection set to plain paper and the image set to print at actual size. The Packaging Proof document was printed on 255 gsm Semi-gloss proofing media in Quality mode, The Retail Poster was printed on plain coated media in Quality mode, and the Studio Portrait phot was printed on 250 gsm Semi-gloss Photo media in Quality Mode.
Before installing the ink cartridges, BLI technicians weighed and recorded the weight of each with all packaging removed. At the end of each 50-print test run, the cartridges were weighed again and the resulting weight of ink used for the test run calculated for each colour. To ensure that the sub-tank on the Canon model did not affect results, a procedure was followed to ensure that the sub-tank level was at its maximum before the print run com-menced and again after the print run was completed, thereby ensuring that ink replenishment of the sub-tanks was taken into account for each print run. Canon imagePROGRAF iPF6450: one cartridge was then run to exhaustion and the weight of the empty cartridge was recorded. Epson Stylus Pro 7900: one cartridge was then run to exhaustion and the weight of the empty cartridge was re-corded. The percentage of ink used per cartridge was calculated by dividing the net weight of ink used in the print run by the overall weight of ink in each cartridge and multiplying by 100. The percentage of total ink used per printer was calculated by adding the percentages used of each of the car-tridges and dividing by the number of cartridges. Testing was conducted in BLI's European test lab, in an atmospherically controlled environment monitored by a 24/7 Dickson Temperature/RH chart recorder, ensuring that typical office conditions were maintained. All paper used in testing was allowed to acclimatize inside the facility for a minimum of 12 hours before being used. BLI's dedicated test network in Europe, consisting of Windows 7 workstations, 10/100/1000BaseTX network switches and CAT5e/6 cabling.
This report has been reproduced with the written permission of Buyers Laboratory LLC. Any duplication of this report without the written permission of Buyers Laboratory is unlawful and violators will be prosecuted. 2013 Buyers Laboratory LLC. To purchase reprints, contact BLI at (201) 488-0404 (x17) or at info@buyerslab.com. • 121205 Canon iPF6450 v Epson SP7900 Custom Test Report The test methods and procedures employed by BLI in its lab testing include BLI's proprietary procedures and industry-standard test procedures. In addition to a number of proprietary test documents, BLI uses industry standard files including an IT8 test file and an ASTM monochrome test document for evaluating black image quality. In addition to a visual observation, colour print quality and gamut size are evaluated using a profile software tool from Colour Confidence that was read using an EFI ES-1000 colour spectrophotometer and analysed using Chromix ColorThink Pro 3.0 software. Density of black and colour output was measured using an X-Rite 508 densitometer. About Buyers Laboratory Inc. Buyers Laboratory LLC (BLI) is the world's leading independent provider of analytical information and services to the digital imaging and document management industry. For more than 50 years, buyers have relied on BLI to help them differentiate products' strengths and weaknesses and make the best purchasing decisions, while industry sales, marketing and product professionals have turned to BLI for insightful competitive intelligence and valued guidance on product development, competitive positioning and sales channel and marketing sup-port. Using BLI's Web-based bliQ and Solutions Center services, 40,000 professionals worldwide create ex-tensive side-by-side comparisons of hardware and software solutions for more than 15,000 products globally, including comprehensive specifications and the performance results and ratings from BLI's unparalleled Lab, Solutions and Environmental Test Reports, the result of months of hands-on evaluation in its US and UK labs. The services, also available via mobile devices, include a comprehensive library of BLI's test reports, an image gallery, hard to find manufacturers' literature and valuable tools for configuring products, calculating total cost of ownership (TCO) and annual power usage. BLI also offers consulting and private, for-hire testing services that help manufacturers develop and market better products and consumables.
For more information on Buyers Laboratory, please call David Sweetnam on +44(0) 118 977 2000, visit www.
buyerslab.com, or e-mail david.sweetnam@buyerslab.com. This report has been reproduced with the written permission of Buyers Laboratory LLC. Any duplication of this report without the written permission of Buyers Laboratory is unlawful and violators will be prosecuted. 2013 Buyers Laboratory LLC. To purchase reprints, contact BLI at (201) 488-0404 (x17) or at info@buyerslab.com. • 121205

Source: https://grootformaat.cbs.canon.nl/data/static/blog_archive/grootformaat/2013/06/canon-ipf6450-v-epson-sp7900-ectr-051302.pdf

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Braz J Cardiovasc Surg 2016;31(2):106-14 Clopidogrel use After Myocardial Revascularization: Prevalence, Predictors, and One-Year Survival Rate Paulo Roberto L. Prates1,2, MD; Judson B. Williams3,4, MD; Rajendra H. Mehta4,5, MD, MSc; Susanna R. Stevens5, MSc; Laine Thomas5, PhD; Peter K. Smith3, MD; L. Kristin Newby4,5, MD; Renato A. K. Kalil1,2, MD, PhD; John H. Alexander4,5, MD, MHS; Renato D. Lopes4,5, MD, PhD

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Networks, Social Learning, and Technology Adoption: The Case of Deworming Drugs in Kenya University of California, Berkeley and NBER Harvard University, The Brookings Institution, The Center for Global Development, and NBER Abstract: We examine social learning using data from a program that promoted use of deworming medicine in Kenyan schools. These drugs kill worms in the body; although people are soon reinfected, treatment interferes with the cycle of transmission, generating positive externalities. Individuals randomly exposed to more information about deworming drugs through their social network were significantly less likely to take the drugs and more likely to believe the drugs are "not effective." This finding is consistent with the hypothesis that those exposed to the program had overly optimistic prior beliefs about net private drug benefits. The combination of strong social effects and extensive social networks among teenagers implies that a "child-to-child" public health approach focused on teenagers will speed social learning. There are large differences between social effect estimates relying on experimental variation (negative estimates) and nonexperimental methods (positive estimates).

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